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ISSN: 2641-1768

Scholarly Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences

Research ArticleOpen Access

Effect of Obesity, Socio-Economy and Interactions on Mental Health: A Study of Adolescents in Kolkata, India Volume 6 - Issue 1

Hagar Goldberg*

  • The University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver Campus, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada

Received:November 08, 2021;   Published:November 17, 2021

Corresponding author: Hagar Goldberg, The University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver Campus, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada

DOI: 10.32474/SJPBS.2021.06.000227

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Abstract

Empathy, the ability to understand and share the feelings of others, and experience the world as you think someone else does, is a fundamental aspect of social connection, caring and belonging [1-5]. One’s ability to empathize develops gradually during childhood and is presumably influenced by children’s social environment [6-11]. If empathy is a malleable skill rather than a fixed trait [12,13], can it be nurtured and enhanced through development? What would be the experiences and interventions that would support children’s empathy development? Although empathy has been vastly studied it remained a challenging phenomenon to unlock, let alone translate into evidence- based educational practices. Here I propose a multidisciplinary approach to empathy and present a new frame work to empirically study the development of empathy.

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